The Latest

Jul 2, 2014

breezy point
on M’s bday

Summation of my obsession with Natural Hot Springs:"The Earth farts and I can’t wait to sit in it"
Jun 10, 2014 / 1 note

Summation of my obsession with Natural Hot Springs:
"The Earth farts and I can’t wait to sit in it"

May 24, 2014
cinoh:

Fungi from the Weizmann Institute
May 24, 2014 / 814 notes

cinoh:

Fungi from the Weizmann Institute

(via thesearchforeverything)

May 22, 2014
May 22, 2014
May 22, 2014

Motmot

dendroica:

California and Arizona amaze with two new species of desert poppy

Who said that there is only sand in the deserts? Not quite desert roses, two new species of desert poppies from North America prove such statements wrong with their simple beauty. The newly described plants are found in the deserts of California and Arizona and have a vibrant yellow colored inflorescences, typical for all the desert dwellers from the Eschscholzia genus of the poppy family. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys.
Most commonly known for the iconic California Poppy, the state flower of California, Eschscholzia is a genus in the poppy family Papaveraceae that previously held 12 species. The genus is native to the mainland and islands of western North America in both the United States and Mexico, but the type species, Eschscholzia californica, is commonly spread and has invaded Mediterranean regions around the world.
Shannon Still discovered the new species while studying Eschscholzia for his dissertation research at the University of California Davis. “What is interesting about these new species is that, while people have been collecting these plants for decades, they were not recognized as something different” Still said. “They were always confused for existing species. This confusion led to my study of the group, and ultimately, recognizing something new. I imagine there are many more desert plant species that are also understudied.”
The two new desert species E. androuxii and E. papastillii are found in desert washes, flats, and slopes growing in coarse and sandy soil across California deserts and parts of Arizona. Eschscholzia androuxii has a small range, is fairly uncommon and is suggested that it be listed as a rare plant species. The wide distribution of the other species, suggests there are no conservation threats at the moment.

(via phys.org)
Apr 17, 2014 / 56 notes

dendroica:

California and Arizona amaze with two new species of desert poppy

Who said that there is only sand in the deserts? Not quite desert roses, two new species of desert poppies from North America prove such statements wrong with their simple beauty. The newly described plants are found in the deserts of California and Arizona and have a vibrant yellow colored inflorescences, typical for all the desert dwellers from the Eschscholzia genus of the poppy family. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys.

Most commonly known for the iconic California Poppy, the state flower of California, Eschscholzia is a genus in the poppy family Papaveraceae that previously held 12 species. The genus is native to the mainland and islands of western North America in both the United States and Mexico, but the type species, Eschscholzia californica, is commonly spread and has invaded Mediterranean regions around the world.

Shannon Still discovered the new species while studying Eschscholzia for his dissertation research at the University of California Davis. “What is interesting about these new species is that, while people have been collecting these plants for decades, they were not recognized as something different” Still said. “They were always confused for existing species. This confusion led to my study of the group, and ultimately, recognizing something new. I imagine there are many more desert plant species that are also understudied.”

The two new desert species E. androuxii and E. papastillii are found in desert washes, flats, and slopes growing in coarse and sandy soil across California deserts and parts of Arizona. Eschscholzia androuxii has a small range, is fairly uncommon and is suggested that it be listed as a rare plant species. The wide distribution of the other species, suggests there are no conservation threats at the moment.

(via phys.org)

(via thesearchforeverything)

libutron:

Metallic Wave | ©David Orias
A glassy reflection at dawn on a wave breaking in California, US.
Apr 16, 2014 / 75 notes

libutron:

Metallic Wave | ©David Orias

A glassy reflection at dawn on a wave breaking in California, US.

(via thesearchforeverything)

finally found lucky bamboo in local store today.a wary looking owner, while working the register, said, “stir fry them, will be good fresh.” My face quickly changed from complete bewilderment to a big grin. "These are cheaper though" I pointed to the bunch of asparagus in tow. "How much?" "Only $1.99 for the whole bunch, your [veggie] is $1.49 each.""Ok…then what are you going to do with them?""Sell them, make some profit!"Dollar store humor.Hope these babes will like their new crystal & gem filled home…
Apr 16, 2014

finally found lucky bamboo in local store today.
a wary looking owner, while working the register, said, “stir fry them, will be good fresh.”
My face quickly changed from complete bewilderment to a big grin.
"These are cheaper though" I pointed to the bunch of asparagus in tow. "How much?"
"Only $1.99 for the whole bunch, your [veggie] is $1.49 each."
"Ok…then what are you going to do with them?"
"Sell them, make some profit!"

Dollar store humor.
Hope these babes will like their new crystal & gem filled home…

Tulip cultivars have usually several species in their direct background, but most have been derived from Tulipa suaveolens, often erroneously listed as Tulipa schrenkii. Tulipa gesneriana is in itself an early hybrid of complex origin and is probably not the same taxon as was described by Conrad Gesner in the 16th century.
Apr 14, 2014

Tulip cultivars have usually several species in their direct background, but most have been derived from Tulipa suaveolens, often erroneously listed as Tulipa schrenkii. Tulipa gesneriana is in itself an early hybrid of complex origin and is probably not the same taxon as was described by Conrad Gesner in the 16th century.

http://earthsky.org/space/what-is-a-blood-moon-lunar-eclipses-2014-2015
Apr 14, 2014
Apr 12, 2014

the most beautiful day of spring

wtfevolution:

"How should I decorate this nyala? I’m thinking maybe spiral horns."
"Sure, evolution, spiral horns are pretty cool."
"And orange legs."
"Bold choice, but all right…"
"And maybe some facial markings. And fringy hair!"
"Hey, don’t get too carried away, okay? It’s just an antelope."
"Ooh, how about some stripes? Stripes are majestic."
"Hmm. It kind of just looks like a bird pooped all over it."
"No. It looks majestic.”
"Whatever you say."
Mar 28, 2014 / 3,521 notes

wtfevolution:

"How should I decorate this nyala? I’m thinking maybe spiral horns."

"Sure, evolution, spiral horns are pretty cool."

"And orange legs."

"Bold choice, but all right…"

"And maybe some facial markings. And fringy hair!"

"Hey, don’t get too carried away, okay? It’s just an antelope."

"Ooh, how about some stripes? Stripes are majestic."

"Hmm. It kind of just looks like a bird pooped all over it."

"No. It looks majestic.”

"Whatever you say."

more great gift-lapis lazuli & a great gem water book!
Mar 28, 2014

more great gift-
lapis lazuli & a great gem water book!